TITAN KC Enviro-Blog

Explosion in Federal Building Caused by Meth Lab?

Posted by MikaB on July 28, 2015

The chairman of the House committee that oversees the National Institute of Standards and Technology is asking for an investigation into an explosion that occurred at a potential meth lab at the agency’s Gaithersburg campus on Saturday.

Rep. Lamar Smith, chairman of the Science, Space and Technology Committee, sent a letter Wednesday to Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker requesting more information into the explosion and its apparent connection to drug manufacturing. Commerce oversees the tech agency.

“According to the Associated Press, the explosion may have been connected to a NIST security officer who was injured in the explosion. If these initial claims are verified, the fact that this explosion took place at a taxpayer-funded NIST facility potentially endangering NIST employees is of great concern,” Smith said.

A federal law enforcement official told AP that the explosion appeared to be connected to the security officer’s efforts to make methamphetamine. Authorities responding to the explosion found pseudoephedrine, Epsom salt and other items used to manufacture the illegal, highly addictive drug, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Those materials also included a drain opener and a recipe for making meth, federal officials told TV station NBC4.

Smith demanded a “briefing as soon as possible,” but no later than July 29. He also called for weekly updates on the investigation.

“As chairman of the committee with jurisdiction over NIST, I am troubled by the allegations that such dangerous and illicit activity went undetected at a federal research facility. It is essential that we determine exactly where the breakdown in protocol occurred and whether similar activities could be ongoing at other federal facilities. I look forward to working with NIST to ensure that researchers at our nation’s high-tech labs are safe from this sort of criminal activity,” Smith said.

The security officer, who has not been named, resigned effective Sunday, NIST said.

Asbestos And The War On YOUR Lungs!

Posted by MikaB on July 9, 2015

What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a mineral fiber. It can be positively identified only with a special type of microscope. There are several types of asbestos fibers. In the past, asbestos was added to a variety of products to strengthen them and to provide heat insulation and fire resistance.

How Can Asbestos Affect My Health?

From studies of people who were exposed to asbestos in factories and shipyards, we know that breathing high levels of asbestos fibers can lead to an increased risk of:

  • lung cancer:
    — mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the chest and the abdominal cavity; and
    — asbestosis, in which the lungs become scarred with fibrous tissue.

 

The risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma increases with the number of fibers inhaled. The risk of lung cancer from inhaling asbestos fibers is also greater if you smoke. People who get asbestosis have usually been exposed to high levels of asbestos for a long time. The symptoms of these diseases do not usually appear until about 20 to 30 years after the first exposure to asbestos.

 

Most people exposed to small amounts of asbestos, as we all are in our daily lives, do not develop these health problems. However, if disturbed, asbestos material may release asbestos fibers, which can be inhaled into the lungs. The fibers can remain there for a long time, increasing the risk of disease. Asbestos material that would crumble easily if handled, or that has been sawed, scraped, or sanded into a powder, is more likely to create a health hazard.

Where Asbestos Hazards May Be Found In The Home

  1. Some roofing and siding shingles are made of asbestos cement.Asbestos in walls
  2. Houses built between 1930 and 1950 may have asbestos as insulation.
  3. Asbestos may be present in textured paint and in patching compounds used on wall and ceiling joints. Their use was banned in 1977.
  4. Artificial ashes and embers sold for use in gas-fired fireplaces may contain asbestos.
  5. Older products such as stove-top pads may have some asbestos compounds.
  6. Walls and floors around woodburning stoves may be protected with asbestos paper, millboard, or cement sheets.
  7. Asbestos is found in some vinyl floor tiles and the backing on vinyl sheet flooring and adhesives.
  8. Hot water and steam pipes in older houses may be coated with an asbestos material or covered with an asbestos blanket or tape.
  9. Oil and coal furnaces and door gaskets may have asbestos insulation.

How To Manage An Asbestos Problem

If it is a problem, there are two types of corrections: repair and removal.

 

REPAIR usually involves either sealing or covering asbestos material.

workers removing asbestos material

 

Sealing (encapsulation) involves treating the material with a sealant that either binds the asbestos fibers together or coats the material so fibers are not released. Pipe, furnace, and boiler insulation can sometimes be repaired this way. This should be done only by a professional trained to handle asbestos safely.

 

Covering(enclosure) involves placing something over or around the material that contains asbestos to prevent release of fibers. Exposed insulated piping may be covered with a protective wrap or jacket.

 

With any type of repair, the asbestos remains in place. Repair is usually cheaper than removal, but it may make later removal of asbestos, if necessary, more difficult and costly.

Asbestos Removal

 Titan Asbestos Removal and Abatement Services

Titan Environmental Services can facilitate a wide range of asbestos abatement and removal services to meet the needs of our clients. Whether the asbestos removal is driven by planned renovation, demolition, restoration, or is needed through rapid response due to a flood, fire, or other emergency, Titan has the solution to the problem and can oversee the project from start to finish.

Our team of experienced independent contractors has the expertise to perform abatement projects ranging from large industrial sites to the smallest of commercial and residential properties.  All asbestos removal projects are conducted in strict accordance with all applicable local, state, and federal regulations. Contact Us today to insure your families safety from the silent dangers of Asbestos.

We serve a large range of mid-west areas such as:

  • Missouri
  • Kansas
  • Oklahoma
  • Wisconsin
  • South Dakota
  • Illinois
  • Iowa
  • Nebraska
  • Arkansas
  • Minnesota

 

 

Living in a Meth Lab – Meth in Your Own Home, Business, or Car

Posted by MikaB on April 28, 2015

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The methamphetamine (meth)  lab problem is growing. Meth labs, used to make the illegal drug methamphetamine, are discovered in houses, apartments, motel rooms, sheds, or even motor vehicles. Just as of 2014, federal, state and local authorities were involved in the seizure of more than 1,045 labs in Missouri alone, and the number of meth labs seized by law enforcement agencies increases each year.

As the problem grows, and companies work to restrict the products needed to make methamphetamine, the methods and the locations of its production are changing. This adds to the trouble that health and environmental agencies face in monitoring meth related health risks.

big-DinningroomChandelier

Everyone knows that meth is bad for your health. When people make or smoke meth everything around them is coated with a film that contains methamphetamine. When people or pets rub against these contaminated surfaces the meth enters their bodies through their skin and contact from hands to mouth and nose. Babies who crawl on contaminated carpets and furniture are most vulnerable. They naturally get the highest doses. How much third hand meth exposure is too much?

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The effects of meth residue transfer on to people through surface contact has been compared to studies that include: ingestion of pesticides that are sprayed on surfaces and absorbed through skin and mouth; level of adverse reactions from methamphetamine for children when used for behavioral issues; pregnant women using methamphetamine for weight control.

Some expert researchers, however, linked meth houses to respiratory, even neurological problems, in children. Research conducted by Mike Van Dyke at National Jewish Health in Denver, Colorado, reveals very high levels of toxic chemicals are produced during meth cooking and hazardous chemical exposures can continue in rooms and buildings for an extended period of time, even if there is no methamphetamine left present in the home.

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Using these studies, proposed residue limits of .05, .1, .5 and 1 micro gram per hundred square centimeters, or the amount of meth residue that on a  surface a little larger than a square yard, were studied to decide if they offered protection for occupants. These also happen to be the lowest levels detected by test kits available to professionals.

Currently, there is no one method for tracking or listing homes that were used as meth labs. MDOH is creating a list of reported addresses. Your local health department can verify if the property in on that list. You should call your local law enforcement agency to confirm that a seizure of chemicals took place on the property, and to get the name of any hazardous materials contractor who may have removed materials. The contractor should have information on what chemicals were present on the property. Additional information may be obtained from your county health department, fire department, or the owner of the property. To find contact info or specific statistics on the states we work with select a state link:

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Exposure to any toxic material isn’t healthy, but in our modern world we are constantly faced with pollution from sources we may not even be aware of. We have come a long way in protecting people from dangerous materials such as lead and asbestos, and mold. Unfortunately, the odds of meth manufacturers and users becoming environmentally responsible and protecting the rest of us from their pollution, are very low.  It’s up to you to decide if the protection offered by laws and regulations is enough to protect you and your family from this danger.

We here at Titan dedicate all of our to time protecting the environment around you and your family. Whether it be the hazardous chemicals from a previous meth lab , lead paint in your home, mold growing silently behind your walls , or asbestos lingering in your home; our goal is to make sure everyone is safe from these silent dangers. Now is the time to take the steps to having a clean worry free home by getting an inspection. From there, if the test result come back positive, schedule an appointment with us and rest easy knowing that Titan Environmental Services will take thorough action to protect your family from anymore potential risk.

$1B Lead Paint Case in California

Posted by titanadmin on October 28, 2013

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Sherwin-Williams Co., is one of five paint companies being sued by 10 California cities and counties seeking $1billion to replace or contain lead paint in millions of homes. Defendants also include, DuPont, ConAgra Grocery, NL Industries Inc., and Atlantic Richfield Co.

Joe Cotchett, a lawyer for the cities and counties, told the judge he had met the “substantial and reasonable” standard of proof of lead poisoning to children required for the case to go forward. The key document proving his case came from a 1937 Chicago gathering of staff doctors for each of the paint companies titled “Lead Poisoning, Report of Conference Physicians and Surgeons of Member Companies.” Physicians attending the conference were told not to tell anyone about it, and not to take notes, Cotchett told the judge.

“They knew in the 1930s that lead poisoning of children was happening and they tried to conceal it,” Cotchett said in an interview.

Tony Dias, a lawyer for Sherwin-Williams, said in an interview that the document from the 1937 conference concerns the occupational risks of working with lead, and that it has nothing to do with lead paint.

The defendants argue that each of them have their “own unique facts” and are represented by different lawyers. Sherwin-Williams said in a court filing that the appeals court ruling allowed the case to go forward only as an effort to block future harm, and that the cities and counties “cannot recover money damages or a fund to cover costs of abatement.”

“The alleged wrongful conduct must be connected to the alleged harm today,” a standard which the cities and counties “failed to meet,” Sherwin-Williams said in the filing.

In a 2006 opinion, state appeals-court Judge Nathan Mihara said that while lead paint was banned for use in public buildings in 1978, the companies’ “misrepresentations about the dangers of low-level lead exposure” caused government entities “to fail to make timely efforts to prevent and treat” the problem. Mihara continued, the misrepresentations “increased the cost of treatment for those who had been exposed or continued to be exposed.” It wasn’t until 1998 that studies adequately analyzed the companies’ misrepresentations and proved that low-level lead exposure could cause serious damage to fetuses, children and adults.

The case is California v. Atlantic Richfield Co., 1-00-CV-788657, California Superior Court, County of Santa Clara (San Jose).

These and related lawsuits have been ongoing across the U.S. See more coverage of key decisions in the cases over the years below.

Rode Island

Lead Paint Companies Appeal Rhode Island Decision on Lawsuit Cost

Lead Paint Firms Must Cover Own Costs in Rhode Island Suit

Rhode Island Top Court Overturns Landmark Lead Paint Ruling

Wisconsin

Wis. Jury Rules Lead Paint Industry Not Cause of Boy’s Mental Retardation

Mississippi

Mississippi Familes Lose Suit Against Lead Paint Maker

Missouri

Mo. Supreme Court Rules Against St. Louis in Lead Paint Lawsuit

California

Calif. Court Reinstates Class Action Against Lead Paint Makers

What You Should Know About Mold

Posted by titanadmin on October 23, 2013

Hairy, black mold isn’t just unattractive–it’s unsafe. Whether in your home or place of business, mold could be an issue and your health at stake.

Sure, the idea of throwing a dinner party at your moldy home isn’t an option–who wants to show off their hairy, black regions? But, the risk of grossing out your friends is just superficial. The real concern is the underlying risks you’re taking by living in moldy conditions.

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ARE YOU MOLDY?

A mold problem can usually be seen or smelled–but not always. Mold growth may often appear as slightly furry, discolored, or slimy patches that increase in size as they grow–or it could be dangerously hidden out of site. Often times they produce a musty odor, which may be the first indication of a problem–or when hidden, the first sign is your failing health.

The best way to find mold is to examine areas for visible signs of mold growth, water staining, or follow your nose to the source of the odor. If you can see or smell mold, you can assume you have a mold problem. Other clues include excess moisture and water damage. It may be necessary to look behind and underneath surfaces, such as carpets, wallpaper, cabinets, and walls. There are some areas of the home that are always susceptible to mold growth and should be part of routine cleaning to keep them under control.

The EPA’s: Ten Things You Should Know About Mold

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by: venting bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside; using air conditioners and de-humidifiers; increasing ventilation; and using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dish washing, and cleaning.
  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

(Sourced from epa.gov)

GOT MOLD? Call Titan Environmental at 816-561-0959 today for a free consultation.

The Smart Shopper’s Guide to Toxins

Posted by titanadmin on October 22, 2013

Protect yourself and your loved ones. Use this guide to avoid some of the most common household and cosmetic toxins. Whether you’re reading this as an industry tradesman or a stay-at-home mom, you are a consumer and should be aware.

toxinscleaners

1, 4-dioxane

1, 4-dioxane is a by-product of a chemical process of ethoxylation, in which ethylene oxide a known breast carcinogen, is added to other chemicals to make them less harsh. Readily penetrates the skin.

The U.S. EPA considers this chemical, a probable human carcinogen, and is suspected by the state of California to cause cancer and birth defects. Also, it is a suspected kidney toxicant, neurotoxicant and respiratory toxicant.

Found in: Shampoos, conditioners, skin care, personal care, laundry detergent, household cleaners.

Avoid: Polyethylene glycol or ‘PEG’, polyoxyethylene, any ingredient with ‘eth’ in the name such as sodium laureth sulphate, ceteareth or oleth.

Nitrosamines

Nitrosamines have been identified as one of the most potent classes of carcinogens, having caused cancer in more than 40 different animal species as well as in humans.

NDELA (nitrosodiethanolamine) is the specific nitrosamine “to which human exposure is the greatest.” Since it occurs in cosmetics and is “absorbed readily through the skin (Carcinogenesis 1985, National Cancer Institute”. Nitrosamines are created when nitrosating agents are combined with amines.

Found in: Cosmetics, skin care, personal care, hair care.

Avoid: MEA (Monoethanolamine), DEA (Diethanolamine), TEA (Triethanolamine)

e.g. Cocamide MEA, DEA Oleth-3 Phosphate, TEA Lauryl Sulfate.

Phthalates

Phthalates have had a lot of buzz in the past few years and more and more people are asking they be removed from products. These toxic chemicals are used as fragrance ingredients; plasticizers; solvents, masking agents; and for perfuming.

The risks: ‘Fragrance’ can contain up to 400 separate ingredients, including tluene and phthalates. Phthalates are an endocrine disruptor that can harm the developing fetus and the male testes. Long-term exposure causes liver and kidney damage. high-level exposure causes irritation of the eyes, nose and throat, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and headaches.

The US EPA found that 100% of perfumes contain toluene, which could cause liver, kidney and brain damage as well as damage to the developing fetus. Synthetic fragrances are known to trigger asthma attacks. Symptoms reported to the FDA from fragrance exposure have included headaches, dizziness, rashes, skin discoloration, violent coughing and vomiting, and allergic skin irritation. Fragrance is a common skin irritant.

Found in: Air fresheners, cologne, perfumes, cosmetics, hairspray, nail polish paints, plastics, household perfume products, floor polish, window cleaning products, adhesives, toys and shower curtains.

Avoid: Fragrance (Parfum), Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP), Diethyl Phthalate (DEP).

Parabens

Used as preservatives in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries and as a food additive.

The risks: Parabens are hormone disrupters and have been shown t be a reproductive toxin in animal studies. Parabens act as a false estrogen, which leach onto estrogen receptors in the body, and therefore have been detected in breast cancer tumors.

Found in: Deodorants cosmetics, shampoos, moisturizer, shaving gels, make-up and toothpaste, cleaning products and pharmaceuticals.

Avoid: Methyl, Ethyl, Propyl and Butyl Paraben, and Japanese Honeysuckle Extract (Plantservative).

Formaldehyde

Used as: Cosmetic biocides; denaturants; and preservatives.

The risks: Formaldehyde is classified as a Category 2 carcinogen. Low level exposure causes irritation of the eyes, nose and throat, and can cause skin and lung allergies. It is also a central nervous system depressant.

Found in: Particle board, pressed wood and other newer construction; detergents, cosmetics, shampoos, bubble baths, hair conditioners, athlete’s foot treatments, skin disinfectants and even mouthwashes!

Avoid: Sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (Suttocide), Imidazolidinyl urea (Germall 115), Diazolidinyl urea (Germall II), Quaternium-15, DMDM Hydantoin (Glydant), 2-bromo-2nitropropane-1, 3diol (Bronopol).

Triclosan

The risks: This hormone disruptor accumulates in our bodies and creates bacteria resistance to antibiotics and antibacterial products.

Along with its negative health effects, triclosan also impacts the environment, ending up in lakes, rivers and other water sources, where it is toxic to aquatic life.

Found in: Antibacterial soaps, deodorants, toothpaste, cosmetics, fabrics and plastics.

Avoid: Triclosan (Microban, Irgasan DP-300, Lexol 300, Ster-Zac, Cloxifenolum, Biofresh).

You can also look up chemicals on the EPA’s new ChemView, which lets you find chemical safety and regulatory data, and compare chemical use, health and environmental effects. Or, read their blog post about ChemView.

A GOOD RULE OF THUMB: If you cannot pronounce the ingredient, it probably isn’t good for you. Another suggestion: avoid products with more than five ingredients.

Mercury Levels in Fish

Posted by titanadmin on October 21, 2013

Mercury in the fish we like to eat is a big problem in the United States and increasingly around the world.

 

mercuryinfish

 

Mercury itself is a naturally occurring element that is present throughout the environment and in plants and animals. But human industrial activity (such as coal-fired electricity generation, smelting and the incineration of waste) ratchets up the amount of airborne mercury and coal ash, which eventually finds its way into lakes, rivers and the ocean, where it is gobbled up by unsuspecting fish and other marine life (sourced from Scientific American). And, there are studies linking warmer water temperatures to greater levels of mercury in fish.

 

Know which fish are considered low risk, medium risk or high risk in association with Mercury levels:


Low Risk

Arctic Cod

Anchovies

Butterfish

Catfish

Clam

Crabfish/Crayfish

Croaker (Atlantic*)

Flounder*

Haddock (Atlantic*)

Hake

Herring

Mackerel (N. Atlantic, Chub)

Mullet

Oyster

Perch (Ocean)

Plaice

Pollock

Salmon (WILD-fresh or canned)

Sardine

Scallop*

Sole (Pacific)

Squid (Calimari)

Tilapia

Trout (Freshwater)

Whitefish

Whiting

 

 

Medium Risk

Bass (Striped, Black)

Carp

Cod (Alaskan*)

Croaker (white Pacific)

Halibut (Pacific, Atlantic*)

Jacksmelt (Silverside)

Lobster

Mahi Mahi

Monkfish*

Perch (Freshwater)

Sablefish

Skate*

Tuna (Canned Chunk Light, Skipjack*) Weakfish (Sea Trout)

 

High Risk

Bluefish

Grouper*

Mackerel (King, Spanish, Gulf)

Marlin*

Orange Roughy*

Seabass (Chilean*)

Shark*

Swordfish*

Tuna(Canned Albacore, Ahi*, Bigeye*, Yellowfin*)

 

 

 

 

Lately a controversial debate is growing: every bluefin tuna tested in the waters off California has shown to be contaminated with radiation that originated in Fukushima. National Geographic states this is not a concern because the amount is so low. Though many environmentalists state it is enough to raise concern.

 

*Overfished

Mercury Levels Source: Natural Resources Defense Council – nrdc.org

It’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week!

Posted by titanadmin on October 20, 2013

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This year’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week theme, “Lead-Free Kids for a Healthy Future,” underscores the importance of the many ways parents can reduce a child’s exposure to lead and prevent its serious health effects.

Spread the Word! Visit epa’s website to learn more.

If you live in a pre-1978 home, chances are you have lead. Click here to learn more about how you can protect your family.

According to the World Health Organization, lead poisoning is entirely preventable, yet lead exposure is estimated to account for 0.6% of the global burden of disease, with the highest burden in developing regions. Childhood lead exposure is estimated to contribute to about 600 000 new cases of children with intellectual disabilities every year. Even though there is wide recognition of this problem and many countries have taken action, exposure to lead, particularly in childhood, remains of key concern to health care providers and public health officials worldwide.

Other Resources

Other federal agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), plan to conduct various education and awareness events for Lead Poisoning Prevention Week. For more information about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week or lead poisoning in general, contact the National Lead Information Center at 1 (800) 424-LEAD.

The Government Opens for Business

Posted by titanadmin on October 17, 2013

When the government shutdown took affect, the EPA was one arm of the government affected and that halt in operations trickled down to Titan Environmental. When the shutdown occurred, we were awaiting our certification renewal to continue teaching the EPA accredited RRP lead safe training course. When that was put on hold, we were unable to teach or even schedule our next class. But, today, the EPA reopened and our application is now being processed.

Stay tuned for upcoming classes. We’ll post soon!

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Did the government shutdown affect your business operations? We’d like to hear from you.

A recent poll, commissioned by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), reported 65% of the public opposed the EPA being prevented from doing its work.

About 94% of workers at the EPA were sent home during the shutdown, halting enforcement of the law and multiple efforts to write new regulations.

According to the NRDC, there were many ways the government shutdown hurt public health and the environment. Read the article here and tell us what you think.

Lead in the Air You Breathe

Posted by titanadmin on October 10, 2013

Lead was banned twenty years ago in automotive gasoline, yet continues to pollute our air.

Currently, aviation fuel is the largest source of lead emissions in the U.S. and will continue to be for the next four years. In June 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency announced the planned phase out of Avgas, leaded gasoline in aviation use for private aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) says there are approximately 167,000 aircraft in the U.S. and a total of 230,000 worldwide that rely on the current 100 octane, low lead fuel for safe operation.

In 2011, a Duke University study found that kids living within 500 meters of an airport, where leaded Avgas is used, have elevated blood lead levels. The EPA estimates 16 million Americans live close to one of 22,000 airports where leaded Avgas is routinely used-and three million children go to school near these airports. And as Kevin Drum wrote in his Mother Jones piece, even low blood lead levels have bad health and social consequences.

The FAA has asked fuel producers to offer options that would safely allow general aviation aircraft stop using leaded fuel by 2018.

However, according to Kent Misegades, director of the Aviation Fuel Club, there is already a lead-free alternative called Mogas–which can be used in 80% of exisiting piston engine aircraft and has been available since 1982. The remaining 20% of planes can run on Mogas with a modification called Inpulse.

So why the delayed phase out?

Without regulatory pressure, there just isn’t enough incentive to change. Flyunleaded.com publishes a list of airports that supply mogas—a list that includes only 3 percent of all airports in the United States, according to Misegades.

A few environmental groups have taken legal action to speed up Avgas’ phaseout. In 2011, the Center for Environmental Health sued several avgas suppliers under California’s Proposition 65, which requires businesses to disclose chemicals that can cause cancer or other health problems. “[The aviation industry] realizes the writing is on the wall,” says CEH spokesperson Charles Margulis. “It’s a matter of time.” After petitioning the EPA to study and regulate aircraft lead emissions in 2006, Friends of the Earth also sued the EPA in 2012 for failing to adequately respond to that petition. A few months later, the FAA announced it would work with the EPA to take concrete steps toward implementing unleaded alternatives.

Banning leaded Avgas in aviation use will be a huge step to cleaning our air, protecting our children, and our health. It’s just too bad they expect us to wait four more years. The health effects of lead in automobile gas were known as early as the 1920s, but it took half a century before the EPA eliminated it. Unfortunately, the tetraethyl lead in Avgas has flown under the radar for decades and is still poisoning the air we all breathe.

Want to make a difference? Do something about it–HELP GET THE LEAD OUT! Here are some suggested actions you can take at a local level:

1. Sign a petition.

2. Contact local airports and demand they offer Mogas or another unleaded option.

3. Join the Aviation Fuel Club.

4. Join a local environmental group (or start one) and work together to make a difference.

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